Archive for December, 2012

Kielbasa

24 December 12

[Herself SEZ: The Ol’ Curmudgeon wants me to add the following CAUTION:

If you smoke sausage or keep it a long time you need to add cure: instacure or prague powder. About a teaspoon per 5 lbs. of meat will do it. Smoking is the perfect environment to grow certain types of bacteria that can make you very sick. If you add the cure you will be pretty safe.

Herself adds, this is to prevent severe food-borne illnesses – like botulism! Also, cook your homemade sausage to an internal temp of 178deg F and hold it there for 10 minutes. This will destroy the toxin which causes the poisoning.]

The people of the Middle East have a real thing about pigs. Unclean! Unclean! Is the cry of both Jew and Moslem. Notice that both groups come from the same neck of the woods. The reason they have problems with the porkers is actually rather practical, if you:

– keep your pigs in unclean conditions

– allow them to eat offal and rats (they’re as good a ratter as a cat)

– don’t have cold weather for slaughtering

– don’t have modern refrigeration

– don’t cook the meat done

You are probably going to have Trichinosis, a parasitic worm that encysts in the host. Gross! Yech! Not only can kill you, but also hurts! BTW – you can also get it from undercooked game.

However, when kept clean, properly fed, slaughtered in cool weather (not found in the Middle East), and properly refrigerated, the risk is non-existent. The noble pig is a staple of people of discrimination and good culinary taste around the world. Now, everyone except the Jews and Moslems has sausage recipes, but the two groups that have made the absolute most of the lovely creature are the Germans and Eastern Europeans. Volumes could be (and have been) written about the German and Eastern European pork recipes. There are umpteen thousand different sausage recipes.

Sausage, Swojska, Polish, kiełbasa

Sausage, Swojska, Polish, kiełbasa (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I must admit that my all-time favorite is kielbasa. Now there are a slew of variations on the word (and the recipe), all the way from the Czech to the Polish to the Ukrainian, generally the whole neck of the woods of Northern to Eastern Europe and on into Russia. Mostly we get wiejska kielbasa when we get it from an American supermarket. The Hillshire Farms u-shaped stuff comes to mind. Now this is pretty good. Just slice it into rounds about 1/4” thick and gently heat in a heavy skillet until it is light brown to dark brown on both sides. Just serve it up and chow down. However, if you have access to some sort of Eastern European market, try some of the variations, they’re just about all good. But, if you want to roll your own, here’s a starter:
.

4 lbs. Clean, tender pork – butt is fine, chunk it into pieces

1 lb. Fatback, chunk it up

1 lb. Beef – if you want tender, use veal, chuck for a rougher texture, chunk it up

1 1/2 tablespoons salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/2 tablespoon ground allspice

other spices to taste and to vary – try some marjoram for that traditional Polish taste

lots of garlic and pepper for the Krakow type

or any other spicing which suits

garlic is always good

brown sugar will give it a sweet taste

1/2 cup cold water

Sausage Casings

Pre-mix all the spices. Grind or mince the meat. Add the spices. Mix everything thoroughly. Stuff the sausages per directions of whatever stuffer you have.

If you’ve got the Kitchen-Aid mixer with the grinder and stuffer attachments then the whole process isn’t that hard. If you are really serious, there are good web sites for professional sausage stuffers. Traditional funnel about $10 (the hard way). Stuffer $75 to $100 (the easy way).

Remember, this isn’t what you get at the grocery in the bubble packs. That is pre-cooked. This is raw sausage and will take a bit longer to cook. Make sure you get it done. You can just fry it up and eat it. Bake it, broil it, boil it, smoke it. If you smoke it, fast smoking will wrinkle and shrink. If you smoke extra slow, the skin will toughen and you will get the kind of crunchy bite that is characteristic of Andouille sausage. You only need to smoke to 175°, the pork is fully done at that temp. The Germans do the sauerkraut thing. The Eastern Europeans frequently serve with horseradish. I like the purple horseradish, just take a slice of kielbasa and spread a little on. Heaven.

Now you know I’m not going to pass by the South, so here’s your Grandmother’s Southern Hot & Spicy Sausage Patties –

1 lb. ground or minced pork

2 tsp rubbed sage

1 tsp kosher salt

1/2 tsp fresh ground black pepper

1/2 tsp ground marjoram

1/4 tsp ground thyme

1/4 tsp cloves

1/4 tsp mace

1/4 tsp red pepper flakes

1/4 tsp cinnamon

Mix is all up. Shape it into patties about ½” thick. Fry it up slowly. Get it done through. If this is too hot, back out 1 or more of the last 4 ingredients. I personally use a lighter touch with the sage, I’m more interested in a balanced taste. And I like a little sweet basil, if fresh.

And, of course, we can’t ignore Basic American Sausage:

4 lbs. Good pork butt

1 lb good bacon (optional)

1 cup minced onion

4 cloves garlic, minced

1/4 cup chopped parsley

1/4 cup sage

1 stick butter

1-1/4 tbsp kosher salt

1 tbsp fresh ground black pepper

1 tbsp marjoram

1 tbsp thyme

1 tbsp sweet basil

1 tbsp cayenne or red pepper flakes (optional)

Mix it all up. Stuff the casings. Enjoy. Twiddle the spices to suit yourself. Works well fried, grilled, smoked, cut up and used in various recipes.

Truthfully, just about any meat can be made into sausage. Deer sausage is popular with Southern hunters of the whitetail. Most of the spicing is optional. Even when you talk about sausage from a given area, every single cook has a different recipe. Many regional sausages get their distinctive flavor from slow smoking. The only thing that you can say for sure is that a sausage is totally up to the taste of the cook. You can’t even say that a sausage has a casing. Remember the Southern Patties? However, generally, a sausage has a casing, is usually ground or minced pork, and has various spices.

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Lángos

24 December 12

[Once again, this is Herself, posting for Himself. Mainly, I forgot to log out and login under his ID.]

This is the plain lángos, similar to the fried breads that just about every culture has had at one time or another. Very near North American Indian fried bread. This is the HungarianCentral European – version. For more discussion see the Krumplis Lángos (potato lángos) recipe.

 450   g  flour (3 cups)
 1  pkg. yeast
 1  pinch   salt
 5  g  sugar (1 tsp)
 225   g  water (1 cup)
 10  g  unsalted soft butter (1 Tbs) 

Put everything in the mixer. 3 minutes first speed. 3 minutes second speed.

Put the dough ball into a greased bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let rise 1 hour.

Depending on what you want to do with this divide into somewhere between 4 and 16 pieces. Either pat it out or roll it out to about 1/8” thickness.

Fry in 375°F oil until golden brown. Turn and fry the other side. Let them drain on a paper towel. Hungarian style: rub with cut garlic and sprinkle with coarse ground salt.

Lángos with cheese and sour cream

Lángos with cheese and sour cream (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Also good for making pocket sandwiches, tearing and dipping cheese, spinach, or whatever kind of dip. Sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar, or honey, for a desert. Just spread butter or cream cheese or whatever for a nice bread side. Very versatile.

Guns

23 December 12

[This is in response to a post on Cooking with Dee.]

I’m not sure what you mean by a ‘gun enthusiast’. So let’s take different views and see if we can get there.

You say you like cooking – so do I. I also like good cooking tools. I have mostly Kitchenaid appliances – I like using them because they are fine – well made, pleasing to the touch – and they do the job I want. I also have very fine knives – Sabatier carbon steel. I don’t know that I’m a knife enthusiast – but I want the tools to do the job properly. These knives feel good to the hand, take a razor sharp edge, are comfortable when chopping, etc. In the case of kitchen tools, I not only like them for what they can do, but also for what they are. However, if I did not cook, I would not have pleasure in the tools.

Same for woodworking – I have a whole shop full of tools – most very fine. And I love them for what they are and what they do.

Now then, guns. There are people who collect them simply for what they are as machines. Many are quite beautiful as machines. I feel some of that but I don’t have the money to collect things that are that expensive for no other reason.

You say that you have an emotional fear/rejection of weapons. OK – but that is emotional, not rational. Much like a fear of spiders or snakes or airplanes. Shall we then ban spiders, snakes, and airplanes? Terms like ‘assault weapon’ are purely emotional terms used to evoke a negative response. So let’s look at some other arguments and see if we can get rational.

Hunting – this is a no-brainer. We have been hunters since our beginning. We still are. It might be noted that if we ban hunting then game wardens have to kill excess herds since we have eliminated natural predators. Animals breed to fill all available food supply and then a bit. When the food supply naturally has a bad year, animals die slowly and painfully. We then have to thin them. It might be pointed out that hunters do and have done more for conservation (they invented it) than all the enviro-nuts out there. Restricting hunting to only black powder or bow is the most rank of hypocrisy and will result in a rise in painfully wounded animals dying slowly. By the way, I remember that back in the 1950s there were herd thinnings and I remember film of rangers in choppers mowing down herds with machine guns. As usual, not all were killed, some were wounded and crawled off to die.

Target shooting – there is a whole lot of pleasure in putting holes in a piece of paper. It is not up to you or anyone else to dictate which hobbies someone might like. I despise football, basketball, and all the rest of the violent sports. Since I don’t like them should I impose my will on everyone else? Even if it is for their own good? This has been the favorite argument of totalitarians imposing restrictive laws. You can’t have a drink – for your own good – created the Mafia and organized crime as it is known and loved today. The restrictive attitude of the early 20th century is still with us.

Self-defense – Also a no-brainer, but let’s look at it. A gun is the ONLY way that an old, crippled, arthritic, weak, small person (or any combination) has of defending against physical violence from a younger, stronger, fitter, etc. attacker. All other forms of defense have limitations. Physical defense – like martial arts. OK – I have to have a fit body, I have to learn and practice for many years. And – contrary to Hollyweird – a larger, stronger adversary will win unless there is a fairly large difference in fighting ability. And so on. All other forms of defense, from rocks to cutting to stabbing to bows all require strength, agility, ability, and skill.

But let us get down to what the Founding Fathers really meant (read the writings of Washington, Jefferson, Adams, the Anti-Federalist papers, etc.). The main purpose of an armed citizenry is to keep the powers of oppression by the government in check. We are supposed to be armed, nasty, and free. The first act of Hitler, Mussolini, and many others has been removal of the guns from the hands of honest citizens. Government cannot, will not, and does not remove guns from the hands of criminals and the insane.

WARSAW GHETTO, POLAND ---JEWISH GHETTO POLICE ...

WARSAW GHETTO, POLAND —JEWISH GHETTO POLICE ARM BAND EARLY 1940’s (Photo credit: woody1778a)

The difference between the Jews in Warsaw and everywhere else is that the Warsaw Jews were successful in taking an honor guard of dead Nazis with them because they had guns and used them. This did several things: They died with honor instead of like sheep in a gas chamber – heroes in my book. They also tied up many German troops that the Nazis could not use elsewhere, which saved many Allied lives since the troops that were shooting at the Jews were not shooting at the Allies.

All governments are magnets for those who seek power and wealth. The main difference that I see is that the crooked Republicans want to take your money, but the Democrats want to take your freedom. Remember that in liberal New York you can no longer super-size a meal because someone else has determined that it for your own good. I am a rational adult human. I will determine what is for my own good and anyone else does not have my permission to make life decisions for me. I don’t understand the logic of people who want to treat children as adults while treating adults as children. Anyone who thinks that government can be trusted to make decisions for them is living in a fantasy land. The reason that you are being scared to death with horror stories about guns is that this government (and the lapdog news media) wants to take away your ability to defend yourself.

As far as ‘assault weapons’, whatever they are: if the government limits my ability to protect myself from it – then that it a good reason to rebel, for each limitation is only another step to dictatorship where I have no say in my life. I should like to point out what the news media has NOT in this country. The same day that the kook broke into the school and killed 20 people in this country the news media was full of it. The Chinese government tsk, tsked and said that we should ban guns. No one has bothered to report that the same day a kook broke into a Chinese school and killed 23 people and children with a knife. Are you ready to ban knives? My 12” kitchen knife would make a nice ‘assault weapon’. People have been killed with rocks. Are we now ready to outlaw ‘assault rocks’?

England and Australia have banned guns. Domestic violence is up. Chicago has banned guns. Murder by guns runs about 20 a week. The only people that gun bans benefit are criminals and dictators. When the sheep ban slings the wolves have a field day.

Switzerland has never been conquered. Even the Nazis ignored it – because, by Swiss law, every household is armed. Isoroku Yamamoto, Japanese commander in chief in WWII, opposed war with America, and wanted nothing to do with invasion plans for the US mainland. He had studied at Harvard and told the Japanese high command that every house in America was armed and there was no possible way to conquer the US by force.

The European model: it is of interest that if you really study the European Union, that goal of socialism that every liberal wants to rule America, you will eventually see that what Germany could not win by arms in WWI or WWII, they have finally achieved today. Total domination of the EU council and that major power of legislation equals Germany now rules Europe. Incidentally, one of the fun provisos is that if you commit an action in your own home [in your country] that is a crime elsewhere in the EU, but not in your country you can be extradited to the other country for prosecution.

Oh yeah, I should mention that if some of those teachers had been armed, the kook would have been dead before he killed all the kids. Actually, since kooks are cowards, he probably would have passed by any place that had people who could defend themselves.

Big guy kicking little guy – how long does it take the cops to get there if no one calls them? If someone does call them? Little guy has a gun – kicking does not even start.

Braised Kale With Pork And Onions

11 December 12
Kale salad

Kale salad (Photo credit: Salim Virji)

[For the Orthodox Christians among us, this is obviously NOT a fasting recipe!]

Most of us old Southerners had kale when we were growing up. Mostly it was just boiled forever with some fatback. Then you poured some white vinegar over it and chowed down. If you were good you might get some cornbread to sop up the pot likker. Not bad.

However – there are better ways to do this stuff. This is one of the latest health food crazes. But this version will NOT make a “food-Nazi” very happy.

 1  bag  kale, or 2 bunches, or a little over a pound
 6  1/4” thick hog jowl  slices, cut into 1/2-inch pieces  
 2  chopped onions
 1/4  cup  red wine vinegar
 6  drops  Tabasco sauce

Simple ingredients to get a superb result.

Chop up the kale, removing the big stems and cook in a big pot of salted water for 10 minutes. Don’t be shy with the salt. Drain and set aside. Wipe out the pot and use for the next step.

Cook the hog jowl down until it is getting crisp – about 5 minutes. Stir frequently with a wooden spoon. Don’t burn it. Don’t be concerned that there will be some sticky residue in the pot – it will get used. There are those who use bacon for this step. Well, you can. Not as good as the curing medium would obscure some very nice flavors.

While the hog jowl is cooking down chop up a couple of decent sized onions. The sweets are the best. Vidalias when you can get them. Some other sweet if you can’t. Dump the onions in with the pork and continue at a good sauté for 5 to 10 minutes, or until they start getting tender. Add the kale and sauté about 10 minutes and the greens start getting tender. If you stir a lot with the wooden spoon all of the nice brown stuff in the bottom of the pot should be cleared up and incorporated.

Original Tabasco red pepper sauce

Original Tabasco red pepper sauce (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Cover and cook for about 15 minutes on low heat. Stir often. Add salt and pepper to taste. Add the red wine vinegar. Do not use the cheapest junk in the store. Use a good grade of red wine vinegar and the flavor will be much better for it. Stir in about 6 drop of good Tabasco sauce. Don’t overdo the hot sauce or the flavor will be wrong.

This can be a side dish for four or a main dish for two. Yes, it is that good. Not your mama’s kale.

A Quick Note From Herself

11 December 12

I’ve been quite remiss – there is a backlog of recipes Himself has given me, and I haven’t been posting them. Procrastination! My great downfall! I’ll do it in a minute – later – tomorrow – next week – etc. Well, y’all will be in for a treat! Over the next few days to weeks I WILL be posting them! Himself will be checking up on me!

Dolled-Up Fish

7 December 12

Here are three different ways to treat any fish – but it works better with stronger fish like cod than it does with more delicate species.

All start with seared or sautéed fish – depending on your preference. 

Thyme+Thyme

Thyme+Thyme (Photo credit: jimforest)

—–Fish—–
 1  Tbs  extra-virgin olive oil or unsalted butter or both
 4  (6-ounce) center-cut fish fillets, skin left on
 Salt and freshly ground black pepper
 4  cloves garlic, lightly crushed
 4  sprigs thyme or 1 tsp. dried
 1  Tbs  unsalted butter

—– Fish —–

Lube a heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Season the fish with salt and pepper and put them into the pan, skin side down, along with the garlic and thyme. Sear the fillets for 3 minutes, turn them over and sear for 3 minutes more. Lower the heat, add the butter and cook another 3 minutes. Adjust time and temperature as necessary for the thickness and species you have. For searing cook hot and fast – you don’t want it burned but rather seared and dark looking. Sauté – use a lower heat and cook more gently as long as needs be to get the fish done and a nice golden surface.

—– Garnishes —–

You actually want to start the garnish ahead or at the same time as the fish so that the fish does not sit around waiting (and deteriorating!).

Make one of the following:

     —–Bordelaise Garnish—–
 2  Tbs  unsalted butter
 1/2  cup  finely chopped shallots
 12  oz  sliced mushrooms
 2  sprigs  thyme or ½ tsp. dried
 1/2  bottle  dry red wine
 —–Plate—–
 6  sprigs  parsley finely chopped or dried to taste

—–Bordelaise Garnish—–

Lube a large skillet over medium-high heat with the butter. Add the shallots and gently sauté about 5 minutes. Add mushrooms and thyme and cook 5 more minutes. Add the wine and boil rapidly until the liquid is reduced by half. Discard the thyme if you used fresh sprigs. One of the small individual serving size bottles they sell in the local groceries works quite well for a half recipe, or two for the full. You don’t want to spill this stuff on your clothes or the tablecloth. You will notice that the wine reduces to a wonderful purple thick sauce that would stain any fabric rather fiercely.

—–Plate—–

Pour the garnish over plates and top with the fish. Sprinkle parsley to taste.

OR

     —–Dijonnaise Garnish—–
 1-1/2  lbs  carrots, peeled and thinly sliced
 1-1/2  lbs  spinach, washed and stemmed
 1  Tbs  unsalted butter
 Salt and freshly ground white pepper
 —–Coating for Fish—–
 2  Tbs  Dijon mustard
 1  cup  fresh bread crumbs
 2  Tbs  minced chives
 1  Tbs  extra-virgin olive oil
 —–Plate—–
 6  sprigs  parsley finely chopped or dried to taste

—–Dijonnaise Garnish—–

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the carrots and cook for 5 minutes. Add the spinach and cook for 1 minute more; drain well and squeeze the excess water from the spinach. It is ok to use a package of frozen spinach – just thaw and dump it in for a minute (do squeeze the excess water first). Lube a heavy skillet with the butter, heat about medium.  Add the carrots and spinach and season with salt and pepper. Cook until well coated with the butter. Stir fairly often. Keep warm. Frozen spinach is much easier – fresh is prettier and more of a hassle. Take your choice.

A 1-liter glass bottle and bowl Bertolli brand...

A 1-liter glass bottle and bowl Bertolli brand Riserva Premium extra virgin olive oil. Olive oil from Italy, Greece, Spain, and Tunisia, and bottled and packed in Italy. Olive oil purchased in a Stow, Ohio store. Photographed in Kent, Ohio, United States. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Preheat the broiler so it is ready when the fish is ready. Coat the fish with the mustard. Mix the bread crumbs, chives and EVOO and spread or pat to cover the fish. Broil until the bread crumbs are pretty and golden brown. It doesn’t take much – you must remember that the fish is already cooked.

—–Plate—–

Pour the garnish over plates and top with the fish. Sprinkle parsley to taste.

OR

     —–Lyonnaise Garnish—–
 3  Tbs  extra-virgin olive oil
 1-1/2  lbs  potatoes, peeled and cubed about  1/2”
 1-1/2  lbs  sweet onions, cubed about 1/2”
 Salt and freshly ground pepper
 2  Tbs  red wine vinegar
     —–Plate—–
 6  sprigs  parsley finely chopped or dried to taste

—–Lyonnaise Garnish—–

Lube a heavy skillet with the olive oil on medium-high heat. Add the potatoes and cook, turning frequently, for 10 minutes. Watch the heat – you don’t want to scorch them. Lower the heat, add the onions, salt and pepper, and cook until the onions are translucent and the potatoes are tender, about 5 to 10 minutes more. Add the vinegar and boil until it has reduced to a thick syrup. Yukon Gold potatoes are good. You can really use any kind you like. You can leave the skins on if that suits your taste – try it both ways and see which you like best.

—–Plate—–

Pour the garnish over plates and top with the fish. Sprinkle parsley to taste.

Alternate suggestions for plating:

Try warming the plates before serving – it adds a nice touch. (That’s warm – not hot.)

If you are doing a buffet or serving at the table you can pour the garnish over a serving platter and top with all the fillets. Then sprinkle with parsley until it looks nice.

Squash Casserole with Mushrooms

7 December 12
Butter and a butter knife

Butter and a butter knife (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Now that spring is here veggie casseroles are worth thinking about. This is just another of the 15 billion ways of serving squash. The main thing is that this one is especially good and easy. You can vary just about any part of this to suit your own taste-buds. This will serve two as a main dish or four as a side dish – just vary the amounts to suit your own needs.

2  fair-sized crook-neck squash
1  large onion
mushrooms, sliced
unsalted butter (about 1 stick)
light wine
kosher salt
pepper
tarragon
coarse crushed saltine crackers

Preheat the oven to 400F. Butter an appropriate-sized casserole dish. Put in a layer of sliced squash.  Put a layer of sliced onion on top of the squash. Put a layer of sliced mushrooms. You can use fresh mushrooms if you’ve got them or canned (usually in a jar) if not. Dot generously with butter. Lightly salt and pepper. Repeat as necessary. When you get to the top layer, then drizzle with a good light wine. A white or rose or so that tastes good to you. Sprinkle tarragon to taste. I like it just enough wine and tarragon to lend taste, but not enough to overpower.

Bake 400F for about 50 minutes to 1 hour. The veggies should be tender but not dried or burned.  Sprinkle a heavy layer of crushed saltines. Dot generously with butter. Back in the oven for 5 to 10 minutes. You want the butter melted and bubbling but the saltines should not be burned. Broil for a few minutes until crackers are lightly browned. Serve while still hot.

Zucchini

Zucchini (Photo credit: Farmanac)

As a variation you could use panko or bread crumbs – but if you do you may have to adjust the salt a bit. The saltines lend just the right amount for the finishing touch. Another variation is to use one yellow and one zucchini, or both zucchini, or whatever. (Kinda’ nice with one yellow and one zucchini).

Marinara Gravy

7 December 12

2012-09-06 - Spicy Marinara Sauce - 0002

2012-09-06 – Spicy Marinara Sauce [Gravy] – 0002 (Photo credit: smiteme)

Kind of a funny name. You have heard of marinara sauce forever. OK – let’s clear up that little bit of linguistic mystery. To the Italians, sauce has no meat in it. If it has meat or meat juice it is gravy. So – this is a marinara with meat. You can make it without the meat, of course, and then it would be marinara sauce. You will find this to be totally superior to the heavy tomato paste based Americanized stuff.

 1/4
 cup
 olive oil
 1  small onion, finely chopped
 1  large garlic clove, finely chopped
 1  stalk celery, finely chopped
 1  carrot, finely chopped
 1  small handful mushrooms, rough chopped
 1/4  tsp  sea salt
 1/4  tsp  freshly ground black pepper
 1  28-oz. can diced tomatoes
 several fresh basil leaves chiffonade
 1  sweet Italian sausage, casing removed, crumbled

Chop up the veggies, heat up the oil in a pot large enough to hold all the stuff. Add the onions, mushrooms, and garlic and sweat until the onions are soft, about 10 minutes. If you want to increase the garlic to a maximum of 5 cloves and gag your neighbors feel free. The Italians range from reasonable garlic use to totally ridiculous. Too much garlic and you can’t possibly taste anything else.

Oh yeah, chiffonade, just a French word for shredding or making rag-like. Easiest way is to take some sharp scissors and snip the basil up. Traditional chiffonade method is to stack the leaves, roll them into a tight tube, then cut into narrow strips. Either way is OK. The traditional method does produce prettier, more uniform strips. There are some good videos on YouTube and other places to learn good chiffonade technique.

Add the celery, carrots, sausage, salt, and pepper. Sweat until all the vegetables are soft, about 10 minutes.

Add the tomatoes and basil. Simmer uncovered over low heat until the sauce thickens, about 1 hour. Don’t let it dry out, add a bit more water as needed. Serve over spaghetti or as a side dish.

Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, the true "par...

Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, the true “parmesan” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Season the sauce with more salt and pepper, to taste only if needed.

You could shred a bit of Parmigiano-Reggiano, but don’t use the powdered crap in the can. I advise tasting before adding anything.


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