Buttery Yeasty Rolls

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This will make a very buttery, yeasty soft roll sort of dough. You can do many things with this basic dough.

250 g whole milk (1 cup)
2 pkg. dry yeast
1 stick unsalted butter, melted
1/4 tsp salt
50 g sugar (1/4 cup)
2 eggs
600 g bread flour (4-1/2 to 5 cups)
more melted unsalted butter

Warm the milk to about 100degF. Combine everything in a good mixer. Mix on low speed for 3 minutes. Second speed for 5 minutes, or until good gluten development is observed.

Let rise in a greased, covered bowl for 1 hour, or until doubled. This can be stored in a refrigerator overnight and taken out the next morning. Just let it warm and rise until doubled.

Now you need to decide what to do with this stuff:

Clover Leaf Rolls: No need to roll. Just pull off 38 gram pieces and cut or pull each piece into rough thirds. Then very gently roll each third into a ball and put the three into greased muffin pan cups. Let rise until doubled, then brush with melted butter and bake at 400oF for 15 minutes. Move to a cooling rack immediately and brush again with melted butter.

Soft Square Rolls (Krystal buns to the Southerner): Roll out about ½” thick and cut into pieces about 38 grams each, square. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper and place the square pieces close together, so they will barely touch and join in the bake. Let them rise until fully doubled. Brush with melted butter and bake 400oF 15 minutes, or until golden brown. Move to a cooling rack immediately and brush again with melted butter.

Parker House Rolls: Roll out about ½” thick and cut into 3” rounds. Brush with melted butter, fold in half and seal the edges with your fingers. Place on greased (or non-stick) baking sheets far enough so that they do not come together during the bake. Let them rise until doubled. Brush with melted butter and bake 350oF 20 minutes. Move to a cooling rack immediately and brush again with melted butter.

Burger Buns: Roll out about ½” thick and cut into the correct size for your use. A 3” cutter will give a fair sized bun. A 4” cutter will give a jumbo bun. Let them rise until doubled. Brush with warm butter and bake at 400oF 20 minutes. Move to a cooling rack immediately and brush again with melted butter. You can add sesame seeds, grated Parmesan cheese, or whatever just before baking.

Cinnamon-Raisin (or whatever) Bread: Divide the dough into 500 gram pieces and roll out into rectangles that are the length of you loaf pan. Brush with melted butter, then sprinkle with cinnamon & sugar. Roll up the dough into a tight cylinder and place into the greased pan, seam side down. Let rise until doubled, brush with melted butter and bake 400oF for 30 minutes. Move to a cooling rack immediately and brush again with melted butter. Killer variation: soak some good raisins in water (or brandy) for about 1/2 hour, then drain well and sprinkle over the dough before rolling into a cylinder.

Notice the common threads:

Let the shape rise until it is doubled – soft and fluffy to the touch.
Brush with melted butter just before popping into the oven.
Bake until golden brown, you do not want a hard crust or dry crumb.
Brush with melted butter just after removing from the oven.

Makes about 24 soft rolls.

{{Herself Sez: on the Parker House Rolls, you may want to make them smaller, rolled thinner and cut to 2” circles The 3” ones himself made were entirely too large – to my taste. I was brought up on little ones, so these were a bit “much” for me. Good, though!}}

The dough is slightly sweet, and thus will make wonderful dessert-type rolls with the addition of a small amount of sugar, perhaps some fruit, such as raisins, and some cinnamon or cardamom.

{{Herself Sez: This is a very versatile dough – useful for many purposes. For those who don’t like biscuits (such as Himself), simply cutting them in 2” rounds and baking will make a nice yeast-raised breakfast roll. I’m a biscuit afficianado, but I like rolls, too!}}

Add grated cheddar cheese and finely chopped (not minced) garlic for a garlic-cheese roll that is delicious.

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