The myth of the bomb –

by

One of the myths that liberals seem to believe that gives them comfort as they try to portray the US as an evil country is that the atomic bombing of Japan was totally unnecessary and evil.

Let us look at some historical fact. Not myth. Fact.

All prior Allied battle experience with the Japanese forces showed that they would fight like madmen and would rarely surrender. The Allies had learned to respect this fierce and implacable foe. And they had learned that Japanese territory could only be conquered with great cost in men and material. The Battle of Okinawa only confirmed the Allies worst views.

The Battle of Okinawa was fought as the prelude to and the staging point for the invasion of Japan proper. It must be realized that the oath of a Japanese soldier was to fight to the death and never to embarrass his family by surrender. The Battle of Okinawa lasted from late March to June of 1945.

The battle has been called the “rain of steel” because of the intensity of the fighting, the gunfire, and the sheer volume of men and material the battle cost. US losses were somewhere around 70,000 men. The Japanese losses were somewhat similar. The civilian deaths were somewhere between 70,000 to 140,000. Almost the entire infrastructure of the island was destroyed and the remaining civilian populous would have died of starvation if not for Allied relief  efforts. We are looking at somewhere between 200,000 to 250,000 casualties for the conquest of this island.

The Battle of Okinawa saw heavy use of the Kamikaze tactics. The Japanese would not surrender. The US High Command estimated that the conquest of Japan proper would cost over 1,000,000 US casualties, probably another million of other Allied troops, several millions Japanese military, and tens of millions estimated Japanese civilian deaths. We are probably talking about 15 million casualties to subdue the Japanese Empire.

There was no way to deal with the Japanese other than defeating them. They would not surrender without defeat. They would not come to a bargaining table and promise to be good boys in the future.

It must be remembered that the US had been bombing Japanese cities since1942, with great destruction and somewhere around 500,000 civilian casualties and some 5 million rendered homeless. The Japanese will to fight had not been weakened in the least.

The High Command decided that possibly the atomic bomb could get through the Japanese will to fight to the end and might result in millions of lives saved. On August 6, 1945 Hiroshima was bombed with casualties around 70,000. The Japanese did not immediately surrender so the city of Nagasaki was bombed on August 9, with casualties around 40,000. The Japanese finally understood that total destruction would be their lot if they continued to fight. It is true that many more people died later of radiation poisoning, bringing the totals to 140,000 for Hiroshima and 80,000 for Nagasaki. However, 220,000 is better than 15 million by a long shot.

Herself Sez: So many people are convinced that the Atomic bombings of Nagasaki and Hiroshima caused millions of deaths that I wanted to add just a touch of reality here. This is the researched and documented numbers of dead from the final statistics:

TABLE A: Estimates of Casualties
Hiroshima Nagasaki
Pre-raid population 255,000 195,000
Dead 66,000 39,000
Injured 69,000 25,000
Total Casualties 135,000 64,000

So in this case, Himself actually overestimated the deaths and injuries. Now, back to Himself’s rantings!

Now, libs, please explain to me why the US is so evil for using a weapon that saved 14-3/4 million lives and kept the Allies from having to completely destroy the infrastructure of Japan, which would have resulted in the complete obliteration of the country.

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One Response to “The myth of the bomb –”

  1. The Sagebrush Gazette Says:

    Libs just don’t “get it.”

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